Go to ...
RSS Feed

New Legislation Drafted To Fight Uptick In Bias Crimes Against Asians



by Alex Lloyd Gross

Hate has been around way before COVID-19.  Some of the reasons people are racist or bigots is the color of someone’s skin, or their religious beliefs.  Now, with COVID-19, racists are now turning their attention to people from China that are lawfully in America. They are blaming them for either starting the virus or bringing it here. What they are doing is wrong.

A press conference, via telephone was held today, April 2, 2020 to bring attention to this alarming trend. Pennsylvania State Police Lt. William Slayton was a part of this conference. His office investigates bias crimes. “The youngest person we have charges with ethnic intimidation was 13 years old. Imagine what charges and adult may face,” he said. Examples of the kind of incidents he wants to stop  could be verbal abuse by someone, vandalism of a Chinese owned business or a call to action against Chinese people via social media. Local police can investigate it as well. If they lack the reseources, the state police  can take over the investigation.

“Do not be afraid to report it,  we have many people here that can speak with you in many different languages,” Slayton said.  There is bipartisan support for several bills now in the house and senate.  However, since democrats were the primary sponsors of these bills, they were the only ones attending the press conference.

HB 2013T his bill would step up civil and criminal penalties on those who target individuals or groups because of their race, color, religion, national origin, actual or perceived ancestry, mental or physical disability, sexual orientation, gender or gender identity. It would also provide tools to fight Civil Rights Violations such as preliminary and permanent injunctive relief against continued violators and people who solicit or provide aid to such violators.

HB 2012 With the number of hate crimes increasing by 17% across the nation according to the U.S. Department of Justice, it is time we provide our law enforcement officials with the tools they need to properly investigate, identify and report crimes of ethnic intimidation.

HB 2010  his legislation would require postsecondary institutions to offer online and anonymous reporting options for students and employees. Anonymous online reporting alerts campus police of a possible hate crime while at the same time serving as an early point of contact, when a victim can learn about the steps required to file a formal report.

HB 2011 This legislation would require, as a condition of probation or parole, an individual who is convicted of ethnic intimidation to perform community service or complete educational classes relating to the motivating factor of the underlying crime. For example, an individual convicted of ethnic intimidation against an individual who is Jewish would be required to take educational classes relating to Judaism.

SB 943 The legislation would require, as a condition of probation or parole, an individual who is convicted of ethnic intimidation to perform community service or complete educational classes relating to the motivating factor of the underlying crime. For example, an individual convicted of ethnic intimidation against an individual who is Jewish would be required to take educational classes relating to Judaism.

SB 944 Under this legislation, MPOETC will be required to train all law enforcement agencies under its jurisdiction on how to investigate, identify and report offenses based on race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, sexual identity, age or disability of the victim.

Senate Bill 945 would require postsecondary institutions to offer online and anonymous reporting options for students and employees. Anonymous online reporting alerts campus police of a possible hate crime while at the same time serving as an early point of contact, when a victim can learn about the steps required to file a formal report.

SB 946 This legislation would give the Attorney General the power to track hate group activity across the state in an information database system, allowing for better protection of our constituents, the marginalized, and other communities that are often the primary targets of hate. The information in the database would only be accessible by law enforcement agencies across the state, to better inform them of the hate group activity in their region.

The legislation, sponsored by state Reps. Dan Frankel and Ed Gainey, both D-Allegheny, state Sen. Jay Costa, D-Allegheny, and state Sen. Larry Farnese, D-Phila., will bring Pennsylvania’s hate crime laws into the modern era, extend protections to threatened communities, and give law enforcement the tools it needs to prevent and address hate crimes across the commonwealth.

 


Alex Lloyd Gross
Alex Lloyd Gross has the reputation for aggressive news coverage. With over 40 years experience including working at The News Gleaner, and had his work published in books and magazines that span the entire globe. With a strong background in emergency service related topics, he can bring forth a perspective that others cannot.
A contributor to Starfile Photo Agency for 20 years, Alex has been given access to and has photographed luminaries of both stage and screen.
He now shares his talent with you.

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *